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CVR Onlife: Commentaries on recent articles of interest

Review of articles published in December 2017



RNA in the spotlight: the dawn of RNA therapeutics in the treatment of human disease

Constantinos Stellos 2016.JPGProf. Konstantinos Stellos studies the molecular mechanisms driving vascular inflammation and development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in his laboratory within the Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University. Read his commentary to "Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2." by Scoles et al., Nature, 2017.7 (Cardiovascular Research (2017) 113, e43–e44)

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High-density lipoprotein benefits beyond the cardiovascular system: a potential key role for modulating acquired immunity through cholesterol efflux

vilahur garcia_gemma-2015.jpgDr Gemma Vilahur is a Senior I3P Researcher at the Cardiovascular Science Institute (ICCC; Hospital Santa Creu and Sant Pau) in Barcelona, Spain, where she co-ordinates the Translational Research Department since her return from the USA in 2006. Her research activities have been focused on cardiovascular research, especially devoting to elucidate the basic mechanisms underlying vascular and heart disease pathology (from atherosclerosis to ischaemic heart disease) and to discover and evaluate new potential therapeutic targets/approaches. Read her commentary on "Cholesterol accumulation in dendritic cells links the inflammasome to acquired immunity". (Cardiovascular Research, (2017) 113, e51–e53)

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References

Cardiovascular Research Volume 113