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Increased risk of death for heart failure patients with each NHS hospital admission

Heart Failure: Prognosis
Public Health & Health Policy
Heart Failure (HF)


Rome, Italy – 28 Aug 2016: Heart failure patients have a 2% increased risk of dying with each admission to NHS hospitals, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.1 The 15 year study in more than 450 000 patients from the ACALM Study Unit, Birmingham, UK included 13 416 patients with heart failure.

“Heart failure accounts for over one million inpatient bed days, 2% of National Health Service (NHS) in-hospital work load and 5% of all emergency medical admissions to hospital in the UK,” said lead author Dr Rahul Potluri, founder of the ACALM (Algorithm for Comorbidities, Associations, Length of stay and Mortality) Study Unit.

Worryingly, hospital admissions for patients with heart failure are projected to rise by 50% over the next 25 years. In Europe, previous studies have indicated that more than a quarter of patients with heart failure have been readmitted to hospital as soon as three months after previous discharge and more than 10% of them died.

The current study included 457 233 patients above the age of 18 years who had been admitted to hospitals in the West Midlands, UK, from 2000 to 2014. Of these, 13 416 patients had been diagnosed with heart failure. For each patient, the investigators calculated the number of readmissions to hospital within five years and recorded if they had died during that period.

The research showed that each hospital admission was associated with a 2% increased risk of death. Heart failure patients who had 4 to 7 admissions to hospital over the study period had an almost 20% increased risk of dying compared to those with 1 to 3 admissions to hospital.

“We have a triple whammy because heart failure is increasing, hospitalisation is increasing and this study shows that the risk of heart failure patients dying with each admission is higher by 2%,” said Dr Potluri. “The findings reflect the fact that heart failure is a progressive disease and should be a challenge to physicians to improve care even more.”

He continued: “Every effort should be made to start and/or optimise heart failure medications before patients leave hospital and ensure other interventions such as multidisciplinary community support are available for heart failure patients to reduce the risk of admission to hospital.”

Dr Paul Carter, co-author, said: “We need to diagnose heart failure patients efficiently and ensure that they are taking appropriate heart failure medications prior to discharge from hospital so that we minimise the chances of readmission as much as possible. At the moment, there is significant variation in how well this is done across hospitals in spite of numerous clinical guidelines.”

Ends

References

(1) Dr Rahul Potluri will present the abstract “Increasing readmissions to hospital worsen mortality and decrease survival in Heart Failure patients - 15 year study from the United Kingdom from 2000-2014” during:

  • The press conference “Heart failure, challenges and solutions” on 28 August at 13:00 to 14:00
  • ” on 28 August at 13:00 to 14:00
  • Poster session 3: Heart failure on 28 August at 14:00 to 18:00 in the Poster Area

Notes to editor

Sources of funding: None

Disclosures: Servier Laboratories Limited partly sponsored Dr Potluri’s attendance at the ESC meeting in Rome.

ESC Press Office
For background information, please contact the ESC Press Office.

For press enquiries, please contact, the Media & Press Coordinator, Jacques Olivier Costa: +393427028575 

For independent comment on site, please contact the ESC Spokesperson coordinator, Celine Colas: +393402405148 

The press conference timetable is available here. 

To access all the scientific resources from the sessions during the congress, visit ESC Congress 365.  

About the European Society of Cardiology

The European Society of Cardiology brings together health care professionals from more than 120 countries, working to advance cardiovascular medicine and help people lead longer, healthier lives.

About ESC Congress 2016

ESC Congress is the world’s largest gathering of cardiovascular professionals contributing to global awareness of the latest clinical trials and breakthrough discoveries. ESC Congress 2016 takes place 27 to 31 August at the Fiera di Roma in Rome, Italy. The scientific programme is here. More information is available from the ESC Press Office at press@escardio.org

This press release accompanies both a presentation and an ESC press conference at the ESC Congress 2016. Edited by the ESC from material supplied by the investigators themselves, this press release does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the European Society of Cardiology. The content of the press release has been approved by the presenter.