In order to bring you the best possible user experience, this site uses Javascript. If you are seeing this message, it is likely that the Javascript option in your browser is disabled. For optimal viewing of this site, please ensure that Javascript is enabled for your browser.
Did you know that your browser is out of date? To get the best experience using our website we recommend that you upgrade to a newer version. Learn more.

We use cookies to optimise the design of this website and make continuous improvement. By continuing your visit, you consent to the use of cookies. Learn more

Pacemaker for slow heart rhythm restores life expectancy

Pacemakers implanted for slow heart rhythm restore life expectancy to normal levels, reveals research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Dr Erik O. Udo from the Netherlands. The findings provide a new reference point for the prognosis of modern pacemaker patients.

Arrhythmias


Amsterdam, The Netherlands – Monday 2 September 2013 : Pacemakers implanted for slow heart rhythm restore life expectancy to normal levels, reveals research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Dr Erik O. Udo from the Netherlands. The findings provide a new reference point for the prognosis of modern pacemaker patients.

Dr Udo said: “Previous studies describing the survival of pacemaker patients used data that is more than 20 years old and cannot be used anymore for patient counselling and benchmarking. There have been considerable changes in pacemaker technology and in the profile of pacemaker patients and a new reference point of prognosis in modern day cardiac pacing was needed.”


FollowPace was a nationwide multicentre prospective cohort study in 23 Dutch hospitals. It included 1,517 patients who received their first pacemaker for bradycardia (slow or irregular heart rhythm) between 2003 and 2007. Patients were followed for an average of 5.8 years.
The researchers found survival rates of 93%, 81%, 69% and 61% after 1, 3, 5 and 7 years respectively. Patients without cardiovascular disease (such as heart failure or coronary artery disease) at the time of pacemaker implantation had a survival rate similar to age and sex matched controls from the general Dutch population (see figure 1).

Dr Udo said: “Our results suggest that the prognosis of today’s pacemaker patient is primarily determined by whether or not they also have cardiovascular disease, and not by the rhythm disorder itself. Patients who have heart failure or coronary artery disease when the pacemaker is implanted have the highest risk of death. On the other hand, patients without cardiovascular disease at the time of implantation have the best survival, which is comparable to the survival of the general population.”

He added: “In earlier studies we showed that in cases of too slow heart rhythm, permanent pacing relieves symptoms and improves quality of life and therefore a pacemaker is the appropriate device. In this study we could document that other cardiovascular problems, such as coronary artery disease or heart failure, determine the prognosis of pacemaker patients rather than the slow heart rhythm itself.”
He continued: “After pacemaker implantation for a too slow heart rhythm, more attention should be paid to the detection and treatment of other cardiovascular problems. Thus, next to the regular technical follow-ups of the pacemaker, the cardiologist should also regularly check the pacemaker recipient to improve the prognosis by treating potentially diagnosed cardiovascular diseases.”

Dr Udo concluded: “The FollowPace study provides detailed documentation of current standard pacemaker care in a large representative sample of western pacemaker clinics. The results can therefore be considered a new benchmark of life expectancy of patients treated with today’s cardiac pacing.”


References

This press release accompanies both a presentation and an ESC press conference at the ESC Congress 2013. Edited by the ESC from material supplied by the investigators themselves, this press release does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the European Society of Cardiology. The content of the press release has been approved by the presenter.

Notes to editor

About the European Society of Cardiology
The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents more than 80 000 cardiology professionals across Europe and the Mediterranean. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe.
About ESC Congress 2013
The ESC Congress is currently the world’s premier conference on the science, management and prevention of cardiovascular disease.  The spotlight of this year's event is "The Heart Interacting with Systemic Organs".  ESC Congress 2013 takes place from 31 August to 4 September at the RAI centre in Amsterdam, Netherlands. More information on ESC Congress 2013 contact the ESC Press Office.