In order to bring you the best possible user experience, this site uses Javascript. If you are seeing this message, it is likely that the Javascript option in your browser is disabled. For optimal viewing of this site, please ensure that Javascript is enabled for your browser.
Did you know that your browser is out of date? To get the best experience using our website we recommend that you upgrade to a newer version. Learn more.

We use cookies to optimise the design of this website and make continuous improvement. By continuing your visit, you consent to the use of cookies. Learn more

Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival just 7%

The Paris Sudden Death Expertise Centre (SDEC) Registry is a population based registry using multiple sources to collect every case of cardiac arrest in Greater Paris (population 6.6 million).

Arrhythmias


Amsterdam, The Netherlands – Sunday 1 September 2013: Survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is just 7%, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2013 by Professor Xavier Jouven and Dr Wulfran Bougouin from France.

Professor Jouven said: “Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important public health problem, accounting for more than 400,000 deaths every year. The main cause is ventricular tachyarrhythmias which are often triggered by acute ischaemic events that can occur in persons with or without known heart disease. The survival rate from cardiac arrest has remained low over the last 40 years despite major investment and the epidemiology of SCD in Western Europe is unclear.”


The Paris Sudden Death Expertise Centre (SDEC) Registry is a population based registry using multiple sources to collect every case of cardiac arrest in Greater Paris (population 6.6 million) according to the Utstein Style.1 Cases are continuously recorded (within hours of occurrence) and standardised follow-up is initiated on admission to the intensive care unit. Incidence, prognostic factors and outcomes are recorded.
The results reported today reveal the 2 year experience of the SDEC Registry. From May 2011 to December 2012, 3,670 sudden cardiac arrests, with resuscitation attempted, occurred. Most cases occurred at home (72%) with bystanders in 81% of cases, performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in only 42% of cases. Among those cases only 34% of patients were admitted alive at hospital and 7% were discharged alive.

Professor Jouven said: “The majority of sudden cardiac deaths occur outside hospital so specific programmes are needed in the community. Friends and relatives of people at risk of SCD should learn CPR and attend regular training to keep their skills up-to-date.”


Therapeutic hypothermia and early coronary reperfusion were both significantly associated with survival (p<0.001) but these procedures were used in just 58% of patients admitted to hospital. Professor Jouven said: “These interventions markedly improve survival yet are given to just over half of patients. Most patients should receive both.”
Prognostic factors were initial shockable rhythm (odds ratio [OR]=15.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]=9.0-27.3), age (OR=0.96, 95%CI=0.95-0.98), occurrence at home (OR=0.5, 95%CI=0.3-0.8) and epinephrine (adrenaline) dose >3mg (OR=0.07, 95%CI=0.04-0.1).

Professor Jouven said: “Having a cardiac arrest at home decreases the change of survival by half. People whose initial heart rhythm is shockable have a nearly 16 times greater chance of survival than those with an initial non-shockable rhythm because they can receive immediate defibrillation.”
He added: “The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest was lower than levels reported in previous studies, possibly because of the adjudication process considering only typical phenotype of sudden cardiac death (with also a high specificity), although local specificities of population characteristics could also be involved. As expected, prognosis was poor with just 7% of patients surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.”
Professor Jouven concluded: “Sudden cardiac death is a multidisciplinary field which includes cardiology, emergency medicine, intensive care units, psychology, ethics, public health and medico-economics. At the SDEC all of these competencies are working together to understand and prevent sudden cardiac death. Improving outcomes requires addressing the entire picture of sudden death through population education on basic life support, optimising care, prevention and screening of first degree relatives.”

References

  1. The Utstein Style is a set of guidelines for uniform reporting of cardiac arrest.

This press release accompanies both a presentation and an ESC press conference at the ESC Congress 2013. Edited by the ESC from material supplied by the investigators themselves, this press release does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the European Society of Cardiology. The content of the press release has been approved by the presenter.
More information on the ESC Press Conference page: What's new in rhythmology 2013?

Notes to editor

About the European Society of Cardiology
The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents more than 80 000 cardiology professionals across Europe and the Mediterranean. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe.
About ESC Congress 2013
The ESC Congress is currently the world’s premier conference on the science, management and prevention of cardiovascular disease.  The spotlight of this year's event is "The Heart Interacting with Systemic Organs".  ESC Congress 2013 takes place from 31 August to 4 September at the RAI centre in Amsterdam, Netherlands. More information on ESC Congress 2013 contact the ESC Press Office.