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Female gender increases stroke risk in AF patients aged >75 years by 20%

What about women?

Munich, Germany – August 26 2012: Female gender increases the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) aged >75 years by 20%, according to a study presented today at the ESC Congress 2012. The findings were presented by Anders Mikkelsen, from Denmark.

Atrial Fibrillation


The results suggest that female gender should not be included as an independent stroke/thromboembolism (TE) risk factor in guidelines or risk stratification schemes used in treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation.

The increased risk of stroke and TE in patients with atrial fibrillation depends on additional risk factors, and female sex has been suggested as one such risk factor. The 2010 ESC Guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation consider female gender a minor risk factor for stroke/TE, and recommend oral anticoagulants for females <65 years with one additional minor risk factor, and females 65-74 with no additional risk factors. Oral anticoagulants can effectively lower the risk of stroke/TE for patients with atrial fibrillation, but also increase the risk of bleeding disorders and should therefore be given only to patients at high risk of stroke/TE.

The aim of the study was to investigate the association between female gender and stroke/TE in a large nationwide cohort. Previous studies on this subject have delivered diverging results. Some studies have found an increased risk with female gender, while others have not. The novelty of the current study is that the risk of stroke/TE associated with female gender was investigated in a very large population and in a range of age intervals.

The large study population was assembled by linking patients in national Danish registers, using the personal registration number given to all Danish citizens. The researchers identified patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation between 1997-2008 who were not treated with oral anticoagulants and subdivided the population into three age intervals: <65, 65-74, and =75 years. The specific age groups were chosen because they are used as cut-off points in atrial fibrillation risk stratification schemes (e.g. CHA2DS2-VASc) and in current guidelines.

The study included 87,202 nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients, of whom 44,744 (51.3%) were female.

Female gender did not increase the risk of stroke in patients aged <75 years. The relative ratio associated with female gender was 0.89 (95% confidence interval: 0.70-1.13) for patients aged <65 and 0.91 (0.79-1.05) for patients aged 65-74 years.

For patients aged >75 years, female gender was associated with a 1.20 (1.12-1.28) increased risk of stroke after 1 year of follow up. The 1.20 corresponds to a 20% increased risk in this age group.

“Our study showed that female sex was only associated with an increased risk of stroke for AF patients aged =75 years,” said Mr Mikkelsen. “This suggests that female sex should not be included as an independent stroke/TE risk factor in guidelines or in risk stratification schemes used in treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation. Female patients >75 years of age qualify for anticoagulation therapy regardless of gender because age =75 years is an independent risk factor for stroke/TE.”

He added: “Our findings could have an impact on current guidelines used in the treatment of atrial fibrillation; however more research is needed to confirm our results.”

Abstract

ENDS

Contributors:
Anders Mikkelsen, MB1, Jesper Lindhardsen, MD1,  Gregory YH Lip, MD2, Gunnar H Gislason, MD, PhD1, Christian Torp-Pedersen, MD, DMSc1, Jonas Bjerring Olesen, MD1
1Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark;
2University of Birmingham Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Birmingham, UK
 

References

This press release accompanies both a presentation and an ESC press conference at the ESC Congress 2012. The press release has been written by the investigator and edited by the ESC and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the European Society of Cardiology.

Refers to session:  Atrial fibrillation: the scope of the problem

Refers to press conference:  What about women?

Notes to editor

About the European Society of Cardiology
The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents more than 75,000 cardiology professionals across Europe and the Mediterranean. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe.

About ESC Congress 2012
ESC Congress 2012 will take place from 25 to 29 August at the Messe München centre in Munich, Germany. Information on the scientific programme is available here. More information on ESC Congress 2012 is available from the ESC Press Office or contact us at press@escardio.org