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Valvular heart disease to be Spotlight of ESC Congress 2018

Valvular Heart Disease


Munich.jpgWith ESC Congress 2017 drawing to a close, thoughts go to next year’s Congress—which is to be held in Munich, Germany, a city famous for its vibrant cultural heritage and rich history. Given the extent of research and innovation that is occurring in the field of valvular heart disease at present, the “Spotlight” of ESC Congress 2018 (25–29 August) will be in this area.

Programme Committee Chairperson, Professor Stephan Achenbach (Department of Cardiology, Friedrich Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany) says that the Spotlight will focus on all areas of valvular heart disease. “We will not only be looking at transcatheter valve therapies (although that field is growing rapidly). It is important also to review, for example, advanced diagnostic methods to identify valve disease and to help us better differentiate between valve disease that should be treated and valve disease that can be left alone. “The progress in this expanding field is tremendously fast and this is why valvular heart disease will be the Spotlight,” he says and adds that the topic is one “that is of interest to all cardiologists”.

ESC Congress 2018 will provide science and education across the entire spectrum of cardiology; as with any ESC Congress, it will serve as a single all-encompassing source for the latest and most vital information. For example, four revised ESC Guidelines are due to be presented: hypertension, myocardial revascularisation, cardiovascular disease during pregnancy, and syncope. For those who want to submit an abstract for the Congress, the deadline is 14 February 2018. For information about submission, and ensure your abstract meets the required standards, visit: www.escardio. org/Congresses-&-Events/ESC-Congress/Call-for-Science

The ideal host city

Munich, according to Prof. Achenbach, was chosen as a venue because the city is “a superbly attractive congress destination”. He adds: “It has a conference centre that is perfectly suited to our needs, with modern facilities and ideal rooms for giving presentations to large audiences. Travelling to and from the congress venue is extremely easy and comfortable.” Munich is a city that is full of culture and history. It became the capital of the Duchy of Bavaria in 1506, after which it became the centre of the German counter-reformation and renaissance arts during the rest of the 16th century. Additionally, the city developed as a centre for the baroque movement in the 17th century—giving a home to many Italian architects and artists to weave their stories into Munich’s already rich cultural tapestry.

Munich is a city that is full of culture and history. It became the capital of the Duchy of Bavaria in 1506, after which it became the centre of the German counter reformation and Renaissance arts during the rest of the 16th century. Additionally, the city developed as a centre for the baroque movement in the 17th century—giving a home to many Italian architects and artists to weave their stories into Munich’s already rich cultural tapestry.

Today, the beautiful city is still world-renowned for the quality of its museums and art. It has been home or host to many famous composers and musicians including Orlando di Lasso, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Carl Maria von Weber, Richard Wagner, Gustav Mahler, Richard Strauss, Max Reger and Carl Orff. Also, its world-famous Bavarian State Opera and the Bavarian State Orchestra mean that Munich retains its status as a global centre for music. As well as having a rich cultural heritage, the city is a hub of business and industry. The companies that reside in Munich include BMW, Siemens, and Allianz, the world’s largest insurance company. The city is now a leader in blue-chip technology and a centre of the aerospace, biotechnology, software and service industries.

As well as having a rich cultural heritage, the city is a hub of business and industry. The companies that reside in Munich include BMW, Siemens, and Allianz, the world’s largest insurance company. The city is now a leader in blue-chip technology and a centre of the aerospace, biotechnology, software and service industries. 

Additionally, Munich has a long sporting history. The city hosted the 1972 Olympics—in a stadium that is an architectural landmark—as well as the final of the 1974 FIFA World Cup, which saw what back then was West Germany triumph over the Netherlands. FC Bayern Munich is one of the most famous football teams in the world. Founded in 1900, the team has won 57 domestic titles and 11 international titles, spreading Munich’s name all over the globe and overshadowing their smaller local rivals, TSV 1860 München.

Munich is easily accessible by direct flight from all parts of the world. An enviable public transport system facilitates getting around and a large, central pedestrian zone, as well as many parks, are an invitation to stroll and explore.

Click here to read other scientific highlights in the full edition of the Congress news.