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Welcome to the European Society of Cardiology. Our mission: to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe
 

Treatment with the Anti-Diabetic Drug Alogliptin Does Not Increase Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes 

EXAMINE trial

Topics: Cardiovascular Disease Prevention - Risk Assessment and Management
Date: 02 Sep 2013
Patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk due to recent acute coronary syndromes had similar rates of cardiovascular events when treated with the anti-diabetic agent alogliptin compared to placebo.

AMSTERDAM, The Netherlands – Patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk due to recent acute coronary syndromes had similar rates of cardiovascular events when treated with the anti-diabetic agent alogliptin compared to placebo according to results of the Examination of Cardiovascular Outcomes with Alogliptin versus Standard of Care (EXAMINE) trial presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.

“Compared with placebo, treatment with alogliptin resulted in similar rates of the primary endpoint, which was a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke ,” said the chair of the study’s steering committee William B. White, MD, from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine in Farmington, Connecticut, USA.
“The findings could guide clinicians to choose among the many anti-diabetic agents available when treating patients with type 2 diabetes and very high cardiovascular risk,” he suggested.

 

EXAMINE, designed as a non-inferiority trial, was undertaken to satisfy U.S. Food and Drug Administration requirements that new diabetes drugs be subjected to studies to rule out cardiovascular risk.

“It represents the first cardiovascular safety trial of an anti-diabetic drug in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Hence, for those who are likely candidates for the drug in clinical practice with elevated CV risk, including those with a recent acute coronary syndrome, it is reassuring that alogliptin does not increase cardiovascular morbidity or mortality,” noted Dr. White.
“However, EXAMINE does not rule out longer-term benefits or risks of alogliptin with respect to cardiovascular end points as the median duration of the trial was approximately 18 months,” he added.

The trial recruited 5,380 patients from 898 centers in 49 countries and randomized them to receive alogliptin or placebo, administered in a double-blind fashion along with standard-of-care treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors.

Due to its renal clearance, alogliptin dosing was modified according to kidney function, with 71.4% of patients receiving 25 mg, 25.7% receiving 12.5 mg, and 2.9% receiving 6.25 mg daily.

After a median follow-up of 18 months, and up to 40 months,  the primary endpoint, which was a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke had occurred at a similar rate in alogliptin and placebo-treated patients (11.3% vs 11.8% respectively; P <0.001 for non-inferiority).

As would be expected with an antihyperglycemic agent, end-of-study glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly lower in patients on alogliptin than placebo with a mean change from baseline of -0.33% and +0.03% respectively.

Incidences of hypoglycemia, malignancy, pancreatitis, and dialysis were similar for both groups.  To date, research has yet to identify a diabetes drug that is not only safe but actually beneficial to the heart – an important issue for diabetic patients who are at high risk for cardiovascular problems.

The EXAMINE trial satisfied FDA requirements to show cardiovascular safety but built into the trial design, as a secondary objective, was an exploration for cardiac benefits which were not found.

“There is a need for safe glucose lowering therapies in patients with diabetes who are at an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease,” he added. “Given the EXAMINE study design and high risk patient population evaluated, these results provide key insights to clinicians treating diabetes patients with cardiovascular disease.”

SOURCES OF FUNDING :
Funded by Takeda Development Center Americas, Inc.

DISCLOSURES:
Some members of the Steering Committee received compensation for their committee work while others did not, or gave it to charity. Dr. White discloses that he has received research funding from the National Institutes of Health and consulting fees for cardiovascular safety work from Astra-Zeneca, Ardea Biosciences, Astellas, Dendreon, EMD Serono, Forest Research Institute, Roche, Inc, Takeda Development Center Americas, Inc, Nycomed-a Takeda Company, Teva Pharma. He also serves as the president of the American Society of Hypertension, Inc (2012-2014).

Authors: ESC Press Office
For background information, please contact the ESC Press Office.
For independent comment on site, please contact the ESC Spokesperson coordinator.

Notes to editor

About the European Society of Cardiology
The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents more than 80 000 cardiology professionals across Europe and the Mediterranean. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe.

About ESC Congress 2013
The ESC Congress is currently the world’s premier conference on the science, management and prevention of cardiovascular disease.  The spotlight of this year's event is "The Heart Interacting with Systemic Organs".  ESC Congress 2013 takes place from 31 August to 4 September at the RAI centre in Amsterdam, Netherlands. More information on ESC Congress 2013 contact the ESC Press Office.

References

This press release accompanies both a presentation and an ESC press conference at the ESC Congress 2013. Edited by the ESC from material supplied by the investigators themselves, this press release does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the European Society of Cardiology. The content of the press release has been approved by the presenter.

More information on the ESC Press Conference page: Hot Line III: Late Breaking Trials on Risk factors and Diabetes