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Telomere length after revascularisation

ESC Congress News 2015 - London

A short telomere length predicts adverse clinical outcomes following revascularisation procedures independent of age, according to a finalist abstract at the Cardiovascular Ageing and Senescence Young Investigator Award yesterday.

Basic Sciences, Pharmacology, Genomics and Cardiovascular Pathology
Cardiovascular Disease in the Elderly


A short telomere length predicts adverse clinical outcomes following revascularisation procedures independent of age, according to a finalist abstract at the Cardiovascular Ageing and Senescence Young Investigator Award yesterday.

It is now well established that telomeres, the caps protecting the ends of chromosomes, shorten with age. Several large studies have shown that telomere shortening contributes to mortality in many age-related diseases, and that mean telomere length predicts CHD.

In yesterday’s study Marios Margaritis and Charalambos Antoniades from the University of Oxford hypothesised that shortened telomeres could predict adverse events following revascularisation. They followed up 500 patients having PCI following STEMI and 648 CABG, with telomere length evaluated by PCR of whole blood.

Results showed patients with short relative telomere length were significantly more likely to experience CVD death than those with long relative telomere length (p<0.05), non-fatal acute coronary syndrome (p<0.05), all-cause mortality (P<0.05), and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation after CABG (p<0.01). ‘We believe telomere length measurement could be used to identify patients at greater risk following revascularisation and that such information could be incorporated into risk prediction models,’ said Antoniades.

Programme number 1834: Telomere length predicts clinical outcomes post revascularization procedures: its role as a novel biomarker of systemic oxidative stress and cardiovascular ageing.