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Key library: Sports Cardiology

Publications selected for you by the EACPR Sports Cardiology section


 

Position Papers & Consensus Documents
Position paper: proposal for a core curriculum for a European Sports Cardiology qualification
On behalf of the Sports Cardiology Section of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (EACPR)
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology published online 11 May 2012
DOI: 10.1177/2047487312446673

Time for action regarding cardiovascular emergency care at sports arenas: a lesson from the arena study
On behalf of the Sports Cardiology Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehq006.

Time for action regarding cardiovascular emergency care at sports arenas: a lesson from the arena study
On behalf of the Sports Cardiology Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehq006.

Cardiovascular pre-participation screening of young competitive athletes for prevention of sudden death: proposal for a common European protocol - Consensus Statement of the Study Group of Sport Cardiology of the Working Group of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology and the Working Group of Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases of the European Society of Cardiology. Eur Heart J 2005;26:516-24.

Recommendations for competitive sports participation in athletes with cardiovascular disease. A consensus document from the Study group of Sports Cardiology of the Working Group of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology and the Working Group of Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases of the European Society of Cardiology. Eur Heart J 2005;26:1422-45.

Consensus document regarding cardiovascular safety at sports arenas
Position stand from the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (EACPR), section of Sports Cardiology
Eur Heart J (2011) doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehr178

ESC Study Group of Sports Cardiology: recommendations for participation in leisure-time physical activity and competitive sports for patients with ischaemic heart disease
Recommendations
EJCPR. 13(2):137-149, April 2006
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ESC Study Group of Sports Cardiology Position Paper on adverse cardiovascular effects of doping in athletes
Recommendations
EJCPR. 13(5):687-694, October 2006.

Recommendations for participation in leisure-time physical activity and competitive sports in patients with arrhythmias and potentially arrhythmogenic conditions Part I: Supraventricular arrhythmias and pacemakers
on behalf of the Study Group on Sports Cardiology of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation
EJCPR August 2006; vol. 13, 4: pp. 475-484

Recommendations for participation in leisure-time physical activity and competitive sports of patients with arrhythmias and potentially arrhythmogenic conditions Part II: Ventricular arrhythmias, channelopathies and implantable defibrillators
On behalf of the Study Group on Sports Cardiology of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation
EJCPR October 2006; vol. 13, 5: pp. 676-686

ESC Study Group of Sports Cardiology Recommendations for participation in leisure-time physical activities and competitive sports for patients with hypertension
Recommendations
EJCPR. 12(4):326-331, August 2005.

Other publications selected by the EACPR Sports Cardiology Section


Commotio cordis – under-recognized in Europe? a case report and review

Erik Ekker Solberg, Bernt Inge Embrå, Mats Börjesson, Johan Herlitz, Domenico Corrado
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology June 2011 vol. 18 no. 3 378-383

Cardiovascular pre-participation screening does not distress professional football players

E E Solberg, T H Bjørnstad, T E Andersen, and Ø Ekeberg
European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, 1741826711410818, first published on May 25, 2011

Sudden death in sports among young adults in Norway

Erik Ekker Solberg, Finn Gjertsen, Erlend Haugstad and Lars Kolsrud
DOI: 10.1097/HJR.0b013e328332f8f7

Efficacy of personal symptom and family history questionnaires when screening for inherited cardiac pathologies? The role of electrocardiography
Br. J. Sports Med. published online 21 Sep 2007; doi:10.1136/bjsm.2007.039420
Mathew G Wilson, Sandeep Basavarajaiah, Gregory Whyte, Steve Cox, Mike Loosemore and Sanjay Sharma
English cohort focused on the screening evaluation using familial, personal history, clinical evaluation and 12 leads ECG both on high level athletes and on school children performing regular physical activity: The article emphasize the usefulness of the 12 leads ECG, already known in literature and demonstrate as well the usefulness of the “European model” for athletes also for school children as well. The percentage of subjects needing a second level evaluation is about 10%: a percentage between 5 and 10% of doubtful cases has, in past, already been described in other cohorts of athletes.
Prevalence and significance of an isolated long QT interval in elite athletes
Eur Heart J 2007 28: 2944-2949
Sandeep Basavarajaiah, Matthew Wilson, Gregory Whyte, Ajay Shah, Elijah Behr, and Sanjay Sharma
This article comes out as an interesting paper on a selected cohort of elite athletes concerning a debated clinical and electrocardiographic problem the prevalence of long Qt syndrome
The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of prolonged QTc interval in a large cohort of elite British athletes and to evaluate the significance of prolonged QTc interval utilizing Holter monitoring, exercise testing, cardiovascular evaluation of first-degree relatives, and genetic testing in consenting individuals.
The prevalence of prolonged QT corrected for the heart rate resulted as being 0,4% . A QTc of < 500 ms in absence of symptoms or familial disease is unlikely to represent long Qt syndrome in elite athletes according to the authors.
Prevalence of abnormal electrocardiograms in a large, unselected population undergoing pre-participation cardiovascular screening.
Eur Heart J. 2007 Aug;28(16):2006-10

Pelliccia A, Culasso F, Di Paolo FM, Accettura D, Cantore R, Castagna W, Ciacciarelli A, Costini G, Cuffari B, Drago E, Federici V, Gribaudo CG, Iacovelli G, Landolfi L, Menichetti G, Atzeni UO, Parisi A, Pizzi AR, Rosa M, Santelli F, Santilio F, Vagnini A, Casasco M, Di Luigi L.

The implementation of 12-lead ECG in the pre-participation screening of young athletes is still controversial and numbers of issues are largely debated, including the prevalence and spectrum of ECG abnormalities found in individuals undergoing pre-participation screening. METHODS AND RESULTS: We assessed a large, unselected population of 32,652 subjects [26 050 (80%) males], prospectively examined in 19 clinics associated to Italian Sports Medicine Federation. Most were young amateur athletes, aged 8-78 years (median 17). The prevalence of markedly abnormal ECG patterns, suggestive for structural cardiac disease, is low (<5% of the overall population) and should not represent obstacle for implementation of 12-lead ECG in the pre-participation screening program.

Outcomes in athletes with marked ECG repolarization abnormalities.

N Engl J Med. 2008 Jan 10;358(2):152-61.

Pelliccia A, Di Paolo FM, Quattrini FM, Basso C, Culasso F, Popoli G, De Luca R, Spataro A, Biffi A, Thiene G, Maron BJ.

Some athletes can manifest trivial abnormalities of 12 leads ECG without evidence of structural heart disease and are a difficult diagnostic problem because the natural history of these subjects it is still unknown. This article concerns a large series of top level athletes with long term follow up and demonstrates that markedly abnormal ECGs in young and apparently healthy athletes may represent the initial expression of underlying cardiomyopathies that may not be evident until many years later and that may ultimately be associated with adverse outcomes. Athletes with such ECG patterns merit continued clinical surveillance. Athletes with normal ECG during the inclusion did not manifest, during a long term follow up, any problem This article reinforces the usefulness of 12 leads ECG during athletes screening both in subjects with normal and in those with abnormal 12 leads ECG.


 

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