In order to bring you the best possible user experience, this site uses Javascript. If you are seeing this message, it is likely that the Javascript option in your browser is disabled. For optimal viewing of this site, please ensure that Javascript is enabled for your browser.
Did you know that your browser is out of date? To get the best experience using our website we recommend that you upgrade to a newer version. Learn more.

We use cookies to optimise the design of this website and make continuous improvement. By continuing your visit, you consent to the use of cookies. Learn more

Assessment of functional tricuspid regurgitation

Functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is characterized by structurally normal leaflets and is due to the deformation of the valvulo-ventricular complex.
Valvular Heart Diseases


While mild FTR is frequent and usually benign, patients with severe FTR may develop progressive ventricular dysfunction and incur increased mortality. Therefore, FTR should not be ignored, should be appropriately diagnosed and quantified by Doppler echocardiography, and should be evaluated for corrective surgical procedures. At present, referral for surgical correction of FTR is often delayed until patients develop intractable heart failure. However, this strategy frequently translates in poor clinical outcome characterized by notable operative mortality and reduced long-term survival. Appropriate patient selection and proper timing for tricuspid valve (TV) repair or replacement are crucial for optimal outcome, but objective criteria for clinical decison-making remain poorly defined.

In the present paper, we review the anatomy of the normal TV, the pathophysiology of FTR, the assessment of its severity and functional significance, and propose an algorithm for selecting patients for surgical treatment.

 

Notes to editor


Eur Heart J (2013) 34 (25): 1875-1885
The content of this article reflects the personal opinion of the author/s and is not necessarily the official position of the European Society of Cardiology.