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Clinical challenges in cardiology: the best treatment alternative in difficult clinical case scenarios



The session “Clinical challenges in cardiology: the best treatment alternative in difficult clinical case scenarios” organized by the Cardiologists of Tomorrow predominantly addressed young cardiologists in training. But to our pleasure, also many “senior” cardiologists attended this session with great interest. It aimed to provide practical information on the management of difficult clinical situations and to help outweighing risks and benefits of possible treatment approaches.

As nucleus member of the Cardiologists of Tomorrow, I had the great honour to chair this session together with Professor Carlo di Mario from London. The presentations were partly based on the description of clinical cases and gave an overview on the respective situation.

First, Professor Sanjay Sharma from London, Great Britain very clearly explained on how to make the differential diagnosis in young athletes with hypertension and left ventricle hypertrophy.
Subsequently, Professor Rafaele de Caterina from Chieti, Italy addressed the challenging question on how to manage a patient with recently implanted DES needing cardiac or non-cardiac surgery.
Professor Holger Thiele from Leipzig, Germany, gave an excellent overview based both on clinical cases and on the currently available evidence on what to do after revascularisation in patients with infarction related refractory cardiogenic shock.
The last presentation was given by Professor Kurt Huber from Vienna, Austria who discussed whether or not a patient with heart failure, coronary anatomical lesions and no ischaemia should be revascularised and provided an excellent overview on the evidence-based treatment of chronic heart failure.

The mixture between cased-based learning and formal lectures and, not least, the spirit of the presenters made this session very diverting and memorable – we hope to repeat it next year with even more young visitors and interactivity!

References


Session Title: Clinical challenges in cardiology: the best treatment alternative in difficult clinical case scenarios

The content of this article reflects the personal opinion of the author/s and is not necessarily the official position of the European Society of Cardiology.